Daily Grammar Practice Overview

What is Daily Grammar Practice?

Daily Grammar Practice is a unique, highly successful, research-based approach to helping students understand, apply, and actually remember grammar concepts. The program is thorough and effective, yet surprisingly simple to implement. Daily Grammar Practice is not "fluffy," and it's not a "quick fix." It is a simple, logical process that actually moves grammar concepts to long-term memory so that students can apply the concepts to their writing. 

How Does Daily Grammar Practice Work?

The key to Daily Grammar Practice is its organization. Most methods are organized by concept--a lesson on nouns, a lesson on verbs. Daily Grammar Practice pulls all the concepts together so students always see the big picture. Daily Grammar Practice is also daily. Other "daily" grammar programs require students to apply grammar skills by correcting errors in sentences. However, students can't apply what they don't understand. 

Daily Grammar Practice helps students understand the basics of grammar and mechanics so that they can get the most out of lessons in usage and writing. Daily Grammar Practice works like a daily grammar vitamin. It gives students one sentence per week to work with. Each day, students have a different task to accomplish with the week's sentence. At the beginning of each class, you go over the day's assignment.

Students correct any errors they have made and ask any questions they may have. You explain any new concepts that the sentence presents. The whole process takes a couple of minutes, and you're ready to move on with class. Students learn through daily repetition and discovery. You don't have to do any other grammar exercises--ever. You may be wondering how students can possibly learn everything they need to know about grammar and mechanics with only one sentence per week. Here's why:

Less is more. They really take these sentences apart and understand every aspect of them.

Concepts are broken into small parts, but the program is organized in a way that allows students to see how all of the parts fit together. Concepts are then revisited on a daily basis so that they aren't forgotten.

The sentences they're working with aren't just random sentences. They're intentionally loaded with specific concepts at specific times. They start simple and get increasingly difficult. Concepts that students should have mastered at their grade level appear in early sentences and appear often. More difficult concepts appear later.